//
NEW PHOTOS!

This page is under development and will include photos that have become available after the publication of the book. If you have photos or information regarding the 19th Battalion and would like to see them here, please contact us.

Please note that these photos have been donated by families and other organisations for display on this website. Permission should be obtained from the authors of FIGHTING NINETEENTH for any further use/ reproduction.


THOMAS CASE

5690 Pte Thomas Case 14th Reinforcements of Windsor NSW (Courtesy of Case family)

 

 ROBERT JAMES BENNIE

Photo of 19th Bn men taken in Egypt during 1915 or early 1916. 4362 Pte Robert James Bennie kneeling front left. Note bell-shaped tent and also the bayonet with hooked quillon worn by the man kneeling front right. (Courtesy of Graham Apthorpe)

Group of 19th Bn NCOs taken in Amesbury UK (near Salisbury Plain),  September 1916. 4362 Sergeant Robert James Bennie, centre, rear row. Other NCOs unidentified. (Courtesy of Graham Apthorpe)

 

DESMOND JAMES HAMMOND

6692 Pte Desmond James Hammond “The New Recruit” (Courtesy of Hammond Family)

 

GEORGE BERTRAM LANG

2934 Pte George Bertram Lang, ex-55 Bn, of Wombeyan Caves NSW, KIA Bullecourt 3 April 1917. (Courtesy of Taralga Historical Society.)

 

EDMUND HERBERT LEWIS, MSM

Photo believed to be of two original 19th Bn men taken at Vignacourt in late 1918, part of the recently discovered Thuillier Collection. Seated on the right is 268 Staff Sergeant Edmund Herbert Lewis, MSM. The man standing is unidentified. (Courtesy of Channel 7 Sunday Night program.)

 View more recently discovered photos from the Thuillier Collection held by Channel 7’s The Lost Diggers project on the program Sunday Night at http://www.facebook.com/lostdiggers

________________________________________________

NEW NAMES FOUND

Researcher Rod MacLean of Goulburn has found seven more names of men who served in the 19th Battalion late in the war. He was researching archival material at Tarago when he discovered the names of these men who had originally enlisted into the 56th Infantry Battalion. They were later transferred to the 19th Battalion in 1917 and 1918. They all survived the war. (Names shown below.)

Another name that could be included in the list is that of 1017 Pte Charles Edward Kingsford-Smith who enlisted in the original Battalion in February 1915. However, he only spent about a week as a recruit before being transferred to the Engineers, then to the Light Horse, and finally to the Royal Flying Corps. He of course is the famous aviator “Smithy” who went on to make a prominent name for himself in the Australian aviation industry.

Including the seven new names and Kingsford-Smith, this brings the total of men whom we have found to have served in the 19th to 4850. If you know of any more names that should be included, please let us know.

 ___________________________________________________

BRIGADIER-GENERAL EF MARTIN, COMANDER 5TH BRIGADE

Photo of (then) LtCol E.F. Martin, CO of the 17th Battalion AIF, taken in Egypt in April 1915. Martin was later promoted to Brigadier- General and was commanding the 5th Brigade on the Western Front in October 1918 when the 19th Bn was disbanded to fill the ranks of the 17th, 18th and 20th Battalions.

Photo AWM A2853, provided courtesy of the Maryborough Military &
Colonial Museum.

_________________________________________________________________

COLONEL WILLIAM W. R. WATSON CB., CMG, LEG D’ HON (FR) VD

As a Lt Col, W.W.R. Watson served in the AN&MEF in New Guinea under Colonel William Holmes in 1914. On his return to Australia in early 1915, he was appointed as the first Commanding Officer of the 19th Bn AIF for several weeks during March and April 1915 before taking up the appointment as CO of the 24th Bn, 6th Bde in Victoria.

Photos and Watson story courtesy of the Maryborough Military & Colonial
Museum, Qld.

 

Commander of Infantry Battalion AN&MEF and 24 Battalion AIF, Lone Pine & Western Front

Joined the NSW Scottish Rifles in 1896 and later served in the Boer War as a Lieutenant in the NSW Mounted Rifles. On June 1900 he rode unarmed in to Pretoria for General Roberts and demanded the immediate surrender of the town from General Botha. It was expected that this would be the end of the war. However, guerrilla warfare commenced and it was another two years before peace was declared.

Mentioned in despatches for his services in South Africa and promoted to the rank of Captain.

Commanded the New South Wales detachment of the Australian Coronation Corps to England for the Coronation of King Edward V11 in 1902.

Appointed commanding officer of the Infantry battalion as part of the Australian Naval & Military Expeditionary Force (AN&MEF) raised in August 1914 to seize German territories in New Guinea.

Mentioned by Colonel Holmes in final dispatch. (Holmes was later the commander of the 4th Division and was mortally wounded in Jul 17 whilst accompanying the Premier of NSW around the battlefield).

Upon his return to Australia he was given command of the newly raised 19th Battalion for several weeks before traveling to Victoria to command the 24th Battalion AIF which landed at Gallipoli on 10 Sep15. From then until the withdrawal in late December, the 23rd & 24th Bns shared the responsibility of defending the Lone Pine position. Due to the continual bombing by the Turk artillery this was a most unhealthy place to be located. In November his headquarters was blown up and a number of the occupants either killed or seriously wounded. For his services at Lone Pine he was appointed a Companion of the Bath (CB) and mentioned in despatches. Only 18 CB’s for Gallipoli.

After a few months in Egypt, he led his Battalion to France and during the Pozieres battle on 7 August 1916 an enemy shell again landed in his headquarters and killed every officer excluding Watson who was rescued in a state of collapse. He continued as CO until July 17 when he was promoted to Colonel and spent the remainder of the war as commander of training units in France and England.

Awarded CMG and mentioned in despatches for services in the European theatre. The French Legion D’Honneur Chevalier was conferred on him in 1920 for conspicuous services rendered whilst serving with the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force in 1914.

Married Minnie, daughter of Samuel Hordern at Sydney in 1904. They had no children and Watson died suddenly in June 1924 and is buried at South Head cemetery.

Naming on medals Companion of the Bath (CB)

Companion of St. Michael & St. George (CMG)

QSA w/MID Capt.W.W.R.WATSON. N.S.W. M.R.

1914/15 Star COLONEL. W.W.R.WATSON. 1/A.N.& M.E.F.

British War Medal COLONEL. W.W.R.WATSON. 1/A.N & M.E.F.

Victory Medal w/MID COLONEL. W.W.R.WATSON. 1/A.N.& M.E.F.

1902 Coronation (EV11)

Colonial Auxiliary Forces Decoration (EV11

The French Legion D’Honneur Chevalier

__________________________________________________________________

PHOTO MYSTERY SOLVED

Pte 6897 J Van Emden (left) and his brother Moses of the Belgian Army

This photo of Pte Jacob Van Emden appears on page 403 of the book. At the time of publication, we had not been able to identify who the second soldier in the dark uniform was. Now, with a little help from the family and contacts in France we have solved the mystery of the second man.

Jacob Van Emden was born in Holland and left home as a seafarer, arriving in Australia in about 1912 where he allegedly jumped ship. He could speak Dutch, French and English fluently as well as some German. He joined the 20th Reinforcements of the 19th Battalion in May 1917, declaring his civilian occupation as being a cook as he was a chef at Adam’s Hotel in Sydney. He was wounded twice in action, the second time being during the assault on Mont St Quentin before returning home in late 1918 with an English war bride. After the war he worked for the NSW Tramways and regularly attended the Tramways Union RSL Anzac Day gatherings.

The photo shows Jacob with his brother Moses (also known as Morris) Van Emden in Belgian army uniform. A close analysis of his cap badge shows the letters ‘OA’ which means ‘Ouvrier d’Administration’ or the Commissariat soldiers of the Belgian army. They took the opportunity to have their photo taken after a chance meeting in Belgium in 1917.

Acknowledgements to Mr Jack Van Emden of Sydney and M. Sylvestre Bresson of Peronne, France for providing further information.

 


EDWARD PROCTOR

956 Cpl Edward Proctor and wife Mary, married in London 16 June 1916

956 Cpl Edward Proctor and wife Mary, married in London 16 June 1916

956 Edward Proctor was an original member of C Company, 19th Battalion. He was a boilermaker before enlisting on 17 February 1915. This photo was taken in London on the day of his marriage to wife Mary, whilst on leave from the Western Front. He later was promoted to Sergeant and was a Company Sergeant Major. He returned to Australia in March 1918 after being wounded in action.

Photo courtesy of grandson Steve Proctor of the UK.


 JAMES WILLIAM HODGES McCULLOUGH

5776 James William Hodges McCullough, photo taken UK 1918

5776 James William Hodges McCullough, photo taken UK 1918

James McCullough served in New Guinea with the AN&MEF in 1914 as a Corporal cook with that force’s medical unit. He later enlisted into the First Divisional Signals Company on 18 November 1915. He served on the Western Front in various places as a postal clerk. He was later transferred to the 19th Battalion and returned to Australia in 1920.

Photo courtesy of grandson Malcolm Allen.


JOHN RAYMOND SWAIN DARBY

1173 Private John Raymond Swain Darby, an original of D Company 19th Battalion

1173 Private John Raymond Swain Darby, an original of D Company 19th Battalion

Original bugle used by Pte JRS Darby of 19th Battalion and later AFC

Original bugle used by Pte JRS Darby of 19th Battalion and later AFC

John Raymond Swain Darby, from Enmore NSW had previously served in a militia artillery battery before enlisting in the AIF. He was an original member of D Company 19th Battalion who enlisted on 23 March 1915. He was a bugler in the battalion and also performed duties as the brigade bugler as required. His original instrument, which he carried throughout the war, is still held by his family. In the latter part of the war he transferred to the Australian Flying Corps as a cook, after being wounded and gassed on the Western Front. He returned to Australia in August 1919.

Photos courtesy of grandson Peter Clarke.


WILLIAM JOHN KIRKUP

1222 Sgt WJ Kirkup, MM 19th Battalion AIF

1222 Sgt WJ Kirkup, MM 19th Battalion AIF

William John Kirkup was an original member of D Company 19th Battalion, who enlisted on 10 March 1915. He won the military medal on Gallipoli in August 1915 for carrying messages under heavy rifle fire, although being wounded. He subsequently served on the Western Front and was in charge of the stretcher bearer party which recovered the body of his friend Cpl John Ignatius Mooney from the banks of the Somme River on 30 August 1918 after an unsuccessful attack the night before. He then participated in the Battalion’s successful assault on Mont St Quentin above Peronne on 1 September. He returned to Australia in August 1919.

Photo courtesy of Kirkup family.


WILLIAM JAMES McFARLANE

Photo of 6354 Cpl William James McFarlane

Photo of 6354 Cpl William James McFarlane, 19th Battalion shown here in the pre-war Militia uniform of the NSW Mounted Rifles & Lancers

William James McFarlane, a motor driver from Orange NSW, enlisted into the 18th reinforcements of the 19th Battalion on 29 June 1916. He had previously served in the NSW Mounted Rifles & Lancers. He was seriously wounded in action in October 1917 and repatriated to Australia in October 1918.

Photo courtesy of grandson Randal McFarlane.


FRANK GREEN WEBSTER

Pre-war photo of 1014 Pte Frank Green Webster and his sister Maude

Pre-war photo of 1014 Pte Frank Green Webster and his sister Maude

Frank Green Webster was a railway ganger before enlisting as an original of C Company 19th Battalion on 5 April 1915. He died of wounds received in the Battalion’s first engagement in the vicinity of Hill 60 on 23 August 1915. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Lone Pine Memorial at Gallipoli.

Photo courtesy of great-niece Liz Hoffmann.


 CHARLES VINCENT KELLY 

4730 Pte Charles Vincent Kelly, 12th Reinforcements, 19th Battalion

4730 Pte Charles Vincent Kelly, 12th Reinforcements, 19th Battalion

Charles Vincent Kelly of Katoomba, NSW enlisted on 13 December 1915 by adding two years to his real age of 16. He was also a bugler who carried his bugle throughout his service.  When his real age was discovered, he was serving on the Western Front and was transferred out of the front line to the Australian Corps Working Party.  He returned to Australia in November 1918.

Charlie Kelly, one of three WW1 buglers (far left) at the opening of the Australian War memorial in November 1941.

Charlie Kelly, one of three WW1 buglers (far left) at the opening of the Australian War Memorial in November 1941.

Charlie Kelly also served in WW2 as a member of the 2nd Garrison Band in NSW and was one of three buglers with WW1 service to play the Last Post at the opening of the AWM in Canberra in 1941.

Photos courtesy of the Morrah family of Tathra, NSW


PATRICK McGUIRE

5604 Pte Patrick McGuire, 15th Reinforcements, 19th Battalion

5604 Pte Patrick McGuire, 15th Reinforcements, 19th Battalion

Patrick McGuire enlisted in the AIF on 17 February 1916 aged 42 years and was a member of the 15th Reinforcement draft of the 19th Battalion. He served on the Western Front and returned to Australia in July 1917.

Photo courtesy of great-nephew Robert McGuire.


THOMAS VOLNEY SMITH

Sketch of 2722 Sgt Thomas Volney Smith 6th Reinforcements, 19th Battalion

Sketch of 2722 (then Cpl) Thomas Volney Smith 6th Reinforcements, 19th Battalion

Thomas Smith of Bega, NSW enlisted into the AIF on 2 August 1915, aged 19 years.  He had previously served in the militia with the 34th (Werriwa) Battalion.  Smith was a member of the 6th Reinforcements of the 19th Battalion and served on the Western Front and was captured at Bullecourt on 3 May 1917 along with 17 other men from the Battalion. During his time as a POW he was moved between various camps, including Dulmen, Holtzminden, Soltau and finally to Hamlen before being repatriated in 1918.

Photo courtesy of grandson Ian Hibberson.


PRIVATE WILLIAM DICKSON

1000days_19Bn_PCard

1000 DAYS’ ACTIVE SERVICE CARD

Postcard celebrating 1000 days of active service with the 19th Battalion addressed to Mrs E. Hocking. The card shows significant locations visited during this time. The postcard was sent from France by 5330 Private William Dickson, originally from Sheffield, England but living in Glebe, NSW when he enlisted into the 14th Reinforcements of the 19th Battalion on 29 September 1915. Dickson returned to Australia in June 1919.


PRIVATE ALEXANDER McCOLL

2507 A McColl_scroll

MEMORIAL SCROLL ON DISPLAY IN THE SUSSEX INLET RSL

Memorial Scroll for 2507 Private Alexander McColl of the 5th Reinforcements, 19th Battalion who enlisted on 31 July 1915. McColl was a stock and station agent from Paddington, NSW. He was discharged in February 1918 with debility. He died in 1923 of complications from the wounds he had received while serving in the AIF.

Photo courtesy of Graham Quinton, Sussex Inlet RSL.


PRIVATE JAMES CHRISTIAN BARNES

4660 JC Barnes_19Bn

4660 PTE J.C. BARNES

Photo taken in the winter snow in France of 4660 Private James Christian Barnes of the 12th Reinforcements, 19th Battalion who enlisted on 27 January 1916. Barnes was a laborer from Campsie, NSW. He was wounded in action at the Battle of Flers on 14 November 1916 and then discharged with debility resulting from these wounds on 21 November 1917.

Photo courtesy of great-grandson Luke McCarthy.


PRIVATE WALTER JOSHUA LESLIE ATIKINS

6437 WJL Atkins Edit

6437 PTE W.J.L. ATKINS

Photo of 6437 Private Walter Joshua Leslie Atkins, a laborer of Seaforth, NSW who enlisted into the 18th Reinforcements of the 19th Battalion on 20 October 1916. Atkins was wounded twice in action. The first time he was gassed in April 1918 and the second time on 31 August 1918 during the operations approaching the capture of Peronne on the Somme River, which resulted in the amputation of his left middle finger. He returned to Australia on 20 October 1918.

Photo courtesy of Rob and Liz Atkins.


WO1 ARTHUR HORACE LESLIE GRAY, DCM

7 AHL GRAY

WO1 A.H.L. GRAY, DCM

No. 7 Arthur Horace Leslie Gray was an original member of the 19th Battalion who enlisted on 11 August 1914. He came from Dulwich Hill, NSW. He was the 19th Battalion’s first Regimental Sergeant Major. Gray had previously served in the Boer War with the 5th Commonwealth Horse and then with the AN&MEF in New Guinea in 1914. He was killed in action in the trenches near Flers on 10 November 1916 and has no known grave. His name is commemorated on the Australian National Memorial at Villers-Bretonneux in France.

Photo courtesy of grandson John Gray.

Advertisements

Comments are closed.

WELCOME

Welcome to the official website for FIGHTING NINETEENTH, a book by Wayne Matthews and David Wilson. This is where you will find the most up to date news and information.

FINDING YOUR AIF RELATIVE

If you are looking for a family member or relative who may have served in the 19th Battalion and you can not see his name in the text of the book, he is most likely listed in the Master Nominal Roll on the CD-ROM. The Master Nominal Roll contains 4842 names of men whom we have identified as serving in the unit. They are listed in alphabetical order by surname and each man's entry contains his basic service information. If you think a man has been left off the list, please let us know via the Contact Us link. If you need help using the CD-ROM, a quick start guide is available under ABOUT THE DISC > DISC HELP link.